6 Questions to Ask Your Dentist for the Safe Removal of Amalgam Fillings

Replacing a tooth filling is a simple procedure for any dentist. But, how do you know if your
dentist has been specially trained for the SAFE removal of amalgam fillings since dental schools
in the US still do not teach this? I have collected the following 6 questions from what I have
learned from dentists, scientists and doctors who specialize in the field of mercury toxicity and
the safe removal of amalgam fillings. This list of 6 questions keeps it simple for you to easily and
more accurately determine whether or not you have a qualified dentist for the safe removal of
amalgam fillings. Ask your dentist the following 6 questions:

1. Does your assistant use a small tubular vacuum 1-2 inches above the tooth you’re working
on consistently throughout the amalgam removal procedure?

2. Have you been trained to know to drill the tooth (not the amalgam filling) around the outer
perimeter of the amalgam filling and ‘pop’ the amalgam filling in one whole piece out
from under the filling using a small pick when possible? Where did you get this training?
Know they do not get this training from dental school. Remember, they still teach
amalgam fillings are safe.

3. If you do need to drill a section(s) of the amalgam filling due to it being too deep, large or
very close to or touching the gum, do you tell me when to hold my breath for several plus
seconds while drilling the amalgam filling, and do you do this in short increments until it’s
removed?

4. Do you use an oxygen mask over my nose to breathe through during the procedure?

5. Do you use a rubber dam? Qualified dentists will tell you they may have used to, but later
learned it’s actually better not to use a rubber dam and explain why. But, apparently, if
they do use a rubber dam, it’s still ok. You will get varied opinions from dentists about
this. If they are not at least familiar with the use of a rubber dam to minimize unnecessary
exposure to mercury during amalgam removal, they are likely not qualified.

6. Do you use another specialized air filter just above (approximately 1-2 feet) you and your
assistant’s heads?

If your dentist doesn’t practice these precautions, you may want to consider another dentist. I
have had many patients who were severely toxic cases, including myself, who got amalgams
removed and did NOT have any adverse effects following the removal process. I have also had
many patients that were mildly toxic or not yet symptomatic at all, and had very detrimental
effects following the removal of their amalgam fillings. It is critically important to choose the right
dentist to replace your amalgam fillings.

Please do not be shy about asking your dentist these questions for fear of offending him/her. You
are the client who is paying them for their services and it is your body. YOU are the one who will
deal with the result of their work, not them. If your dentist does apply these safety measures, it
is because they understand the importance of it and will not blame you one bit for asking these
questions! So, please be sure to choose a qualified dentist for the removal of your amalgams.

The following two non-for-profit organizations keep an updated list of more qualified dentists:

• DAMS (Dental Amalgam Mercury Solutions)
www.amalgam.org

• IAOMT (International Academy of Oral Medicine and Toxicology)
www.iaomt.org

Be aware that some of the dentists on their list may not necessarily practice all of these
precautions, so make sure to ask them these 6 questions. Just because they call themselves
“holistic mercury-free dentists” and now claim to be “qualified” by attending a few hour or
weekend workshop, does not necessarily mean they are fully trained and educated in the safe
removal of amalgam fillings, nor use specialized air filters and other equipment.

Too many times, I have seen and heard the unfortunate outcome of what can happen when
someone gets an amalgam filling(s) removed from a dentist that did not apply such precautions.

One true story of what can happen to someone who did not have a qualified dentist remove her
amalgam fillings, was years ago when I was still sick. I was in Dr. Jack Young’s office for an
appointment when he mentioned to me that for years he had a very nice older married couple
as patients who lived a very healthy lifestyle and were in a good state of health.

The wife had her amalgams replaced with white composite filling from her ‘regular’ dentist. Two
days after the procedure, she started having severe panic attacks, compulsive crying, anxiety,
insomnia, compulsive fearful thinking, loss of appetite and headaches.

In just a matter of days, she became suicidal. The husband called Dr. Young immediately for an
appointment and she had just left Dr. Young’s office when I arrived. Dr. Young looked concerned
and upset when I walked in, which is why I asked him if anything was wrong. He briefly expressed
the unfortunate incident to me. A few weeks later while in Dr. Young’s office, I asked how that
woman was doing. The front nurse told me she had killed herself.

In my field, I hear stories like this all the time. I have personally seen, heard of and witnessed
countless dreadful stories like this, including after people get flu shots, and needless to say, it is
heartbreaking. Obviously, this could be avoided simply by not using amalgam fillings in dental
work. But if you already have amalgam fillings, it can also be easily avoided by taking the extra
steps and spending a little more money by going to a qualified dentist for the safe removal of
amalgam fillings. If your dentist answers “yes” to these 6 questions, know you are in good hands.

Mercury Detox Specialist, Connie Fox, HHP, NC · Copyright © 2012 · MercuryMadness.info